Home Dog Training How To Stop Your Dog From Chewing!
36

How To Stop Your Dog From Chewing!

0
36

This video is sponsored by The Sporn Company. Train a dog to stop chewing things up!

LIMITED TIME OFFER: Use the coupon code REVOLUTION at checkout to get 40% off any MARROW™ item purchased at
OFFER VALID UNTIL Monday April 9, 2018 at midnight CST!

Comment(36)

    1. My dog licks for attention, but that’s because I give it to him after he licks me I love his kisses lol I reinforce it lol

    2. Mister E
      Thank you, that is very helpful. Yes, we don’t find it very pleasurable anymore. I’ll be reading and my dogs will lick me without stopping, it’s hard to focus and their breathe really doesn’t smell good at all. I’ll check for a video so thanks.

    3. Dear Mr. Luke, I’m not sure why you are so triggered. I’m not here to troll at all. I wanted to help the person asking the question, unlike you who basically just told them to deal with an unwanted behavior. Also, I never said you didn’t understand the question. I just said it seems like you don’t understand why someone wouldn’t want to be licked… ANYWHERE (this includes hands). Then I proceeded to explain reasons why people might not want to be licked.

      I think Zak is a great trainer, but he obviously doesn’t have time to answer every single comment. Furthermore, he’s not the only good dog trainer out there, so it’s silly to imagine someone should not look outside of his channel for information that cannot be found here. Looking on Google doesnt hurt, as there’s plenty of good information out there. Some people can’t afford a trainer you know.

  1. Hi Zack please give me a shout-out in your next video if you are reading please I have a copy of your book also

  2. We got really lucky with our Borador Buddy. Just keep getting your dog lots of engaging toys like the kong wobbler!

  3. I found this very easy. And the method is not only for Chewing, is for whatever behaviour that your dog has that you don’t want. Just say no and get your dogs attention. As soon as you have have your dogs attention, meaning that he/she stoped doing the very thing that you don’t want. You Award that with a treat and a happy voice. If my dog licks her paws for example, I just say quickly “AAH” with a high pitch voice so my dog looks at me like “WTF”? And then I Award her for watching me. With time your dog will understand that every time he/she does whatever it might be, your interrupting him/her and they will stop doing so.

  4. Hey Zak ! I love your videos, they’re awesome! I was wondering if I could adopt a dog in an apartment or will I face difficulties if I do so?

    1. Just do a lot of research on breed characteristics – you want a laid back dog- and be sure you are committed to how many trips outside you will need to make. Puppies have to go every 2 hours during the day.

  5. I commented these comments on the last video, but you didn’t get to them so here they are again:

    1.
    “Hey Zak,

    I want to say first that I absolutely love your videos. They are both super helpful and entertaining. However, I’m the kind of person who likes to see all the sides of an argument. I looked around YouTube and found some other “balanced” and even one or two all-positive trainers who well… they didn’t like you very much… After seeing all sides of the argument and trying your training to see if it works (it does and don’t worry I only tried yours; no bad collars), I concluded that you were the right side of the argument. I think you should do a video of you with your dog, basically just showing off how ultra obedient it is, to prove to other, criticizing dog trainers that your method works. Also, I think you should show a dog that’s being trained with your methods and by you get better and better at training over multiple months, to show exactly that you were able to totally train it using all-positive methods. I also think you should do a video where you do leash training with a very difficult dog (as in one with a history of biting, that looks difficult and dangerous) if that’s not possible then show an over time rehabilitation of this dog, using humane methods. I think you should do this because balanced trainers and Cesar Milan supporters say “Zak George isn’t a real professional because he hasn’t worked with a really difficult case” and other things like that. Lastly, please please please make a video on how to make your dog stay calm in the car. I’ll be getting a dog soon and I’ve seen other people’s dogs like jumping into the front seat and being scared and I don’t want my dog to do that.

    Thanks so much,
    A big fan”

    2.
    “I posted another comment earlier but I forgot a couple other questions I wanted to ask you. Great video! You often say to feed your dog “real meat.” What does that mean? As in leftover meat from dinner, as in jerky or cold cuts? For treats that keep at room temp, what brand/flavor do you recommend? How do you know whether it can keep at room temp? (Please give your real answer, not your sponsor) I’m currently looking to get a puppy. Should I go for shelter or breeder? Where do you find responsible breeders? Are websites such as petfinder.com trustworthy? I would like to get the puppy as soon as summer starts, or a couple weeks after… how can I plan that out if I’m adopting? Also, I just wanted to thank you for making such amazing informative videos!”

    1. I’m not Zak, but I can probably answer a few questions about adopting a dog.

      Where you get your dog is ultimately up to you. If you are looking for a specific breed, obviously it will be easier to find that through a breeder. If you want to know if a breeder is responsible or not, there are a few steps you can take. See what you can find out about them online: perhaps they have a Facebook page where they share info about the progress of their dogs and litters, and on this page you may also be able to see reviews from previous adopters. You should contact any breeder you are interested in purchasing from and ask them some questions. A really good one to ask is if they health test their animals. Health tests of parent dogs can help identify potential problems such as hip dysplasia or deafness… what tests they will do is largely dependent on the breed of dog, as different breeds are prone to different issues. You should also be able to visit the premises and meet the parent dogs. This will give you an idea of if they are healthy or not and what their temperament is like. It’s also good because you can see what the property looks like and if it’s clean etc.

      When you get a shelter dog, often times you don’t know what you are getting; sometimes even the shelter doesn’t know much about where they came from. However, most shelter dogs are also very loving; you just won’t have much idea about any potential health risks or bad behaviors the dog may have. Of course, if you manage to get a puppy from a shelter, you sort of get a blank slate. The benefit of getting a shelter dog over one from a breeder is that they are cheaper and your money is going to a good place. You will also be opening up a spot for the rescue to help another animal. This is why so many people support adopting from shelters. Most shelters will have you come and meet the dog you are interested in. They will schedule an appointment for you to bring your family members and any other pets you have to meet the dog, and then typically you’ll play together in a room or go outside, you may be able to walk the dog, too. This helps you get an idea of the dog’s behavior and energy levels, and if you think it will be a good fit for your family.

      Of course, sometimes there are shelters that are not up to code. Typically these are “animal control” facilities rather than actual non-profit shelters like the humane society. A shelter that is following laws and cares about their animals will be a clean place. The dogs will be presentable too. Cages will be clean. Typically they have volunteers going in and out with the dogs, so if a dog does leave a mess in their kennel, someone (either the volunteer or another staff) will be there to clean it up shortly. So seeing messes in a kennel is possible, but you won’t see it very often. Furthermore, the cages will be set up so that dogs cannot distribute disease to one another (basically, the sides of the cages shouldnt have open bars).

      I honestly dont think theres much to do in terms of preparation. Obviously you will want to get a crate and some dog food and toys before picking your dog up. You’ll also want some carpet cleaner because even if your dog is not a puppy, they sometimes have accidents (my dogs puke every now and again, so it’s good to have on hand). If you’re getting a puppy, make sure the cleaner can kill the enzymes in their pee. Often times puppies will repeat the offense in the same spot because they can still smell their urine there, even if all you smell is bleach! An enzymatic cleaner is really important. You should also consider getting a garbage can with a lid (though most people already have these) that the dog won’t be able to get into.

      Other than that, just clean your house. Like this video shows, dogs, especially puppies, can be very curious and will get their nose into everything! You wouldn’t want them to swallow something harmful.

      Hope this information is helpful. I have spent some time volunteering at a shelter before, so if you have any other questions I might be able to answer them.

    2. Oh and as far as adoption from a shelter goes, the process doesn’t take very long based on the shelter I was with. Only about a week.

    3. Mister E obviously means well, and much of what he says is okay, but he obviously is not very educated in a scientific way, nor in any other relevant topic… (clear example: “kill the enzymes in their pee”. 1. enzymes are not living organisms and therefor cannot be killed. 2. there are no enzymes in pee. 3. the enzymatic cleaner he mentions later on, has “enzym” in its name because it is the cleaner that contains enzyms to break down certain proteins and other molecules like ureum and ammonia. Anyone with basic knowledge of biology knows this, as enzymatic processes are 3rd grade biology)
      In any case, his advice doesn’t bring you much closer to answering your actual questions. He just feels he should share his experience, and that is nice, it’s his prerogative, and you might say it shows he cares. That’s good. But imho when answering questions, one should truly answer the question completely…

      When you are looking to get a dog, please take the responsibility to get educated advice and maybe even guidance in your choice. It will ensure more happiness for you and for the dog. Almost everyone is able to properly care for and raise a dog, but not every breed is fit for every person, and especially not for every purpose.
      So before asking where to get the dog, ask yourself what is the purpose of the dog for you? Certain purposes require training to start in early stages, which would make shelter dogs unfit.
      Once you have determined the purpose, look up which breeds are fit for that purpose. Then look up the general characteristics of those breeds and see if they are compatible with your lifestyle and your home/family. A good channel to find those informations is Dogs 101 here on YouTube. They feature a large number of breeds broken down in characteristics, pros, cons, required care, etc.
      Now you know which breed(s) you are looking for, you can decide if you’ll get one from a shelter (if the purpose allows for that) or from a breeder. If you don’t care, I would advise shelter dogs, because those are already there living a life that you can make more valuable, whereas breeders will increase “production” with demand, so buying a puppy from a breeder might (not necessarily will!) be a cause for extra litters that otherwise would not exist. (more litters means more dogs that need to find a home, means more dogs in shelters that won’t find a home and be euthanised unless Abandoned Pets Project saves them (Matt Karricker/Vet Ranch).
      IF you go for a shelter dog, be prepared to wait a long time, because there is no guarantee that you’ll find that breed right away. Contact as many shelters as you can, and ask them to contact you as soon as a dog of that breed is brought in. They might ask you why you are so specific, well you already have good arguments because you made a well-educated choice above…
      Also, once you have decided on the breed, join a few Facebook groups for owners, and read their experiences, but beware: keep a smart mind about what you read, be critical, because many dog owners consider themselves experts just for having bought a dog.

      your other questions:
      – About car behavior: in most places the law provides that it shouldn’t be physically possible for the dog to jump on the front seat, so that’s where you can start. Everyone in the car has a designated spot, and so does the dog. It’s also much safer for the dog to be in a more confined space in case of an accident (when he’s loose, he’ll fly all over, or even may fly through the windshield and die). If budget and car space allows, the best is a car crate with fixtures (crate fixed in the trunk). Good car crates have “soft” panels on the sides and towards the front of the car (rear of the crate) which will prevent injury in case of a collision.
      that been said, you will want to train your dog to ride along. Imagine small steps and reward every tiniest success and upon error, take a step back to where there was success. Practically: first play with the car crate in the yard or your house. Maybe even let the pup sleep in it a couple of times. Then put it in the car (or in the crate in the car) without going for a drive, reward, leave the car, reward. Tiniest steps you can imagine.
      – Real meat is to be taken litterally: no processed meat, no synthetics, nothing aromatized. Just plain cooked meat straight from the butcher’s (or equivalent). Like the cheapest chicken breast cooked without seasoning, for example.
      – Treats that keep at room temperature: check the ingredients. Try to find some without sugar (or other words like maltodextrose, glucose, …) and definitely without salt! (brands: I’m sorry, I don’t live in the US so I can’t advise you on brands. don’t be afraid to ask your vet for advice.)
      – How to find a responsible breeder: talk to people who own dogs of that breed (cfr FB groups). They will share good and bad experiences and point you to reliable breeders or breed-specific clubs that have a reliable breeding programme.
      – I would personally NOT trust petfinder.com because there is no dependable screening of ads. There will be good pets on it, but malevolent sellers are on there too.
      – don’t make your choice based on your planning. Make your planning based on your choice… If you rush into a choice because you insist on having it when summer starts, you risk settling for something that you otherwise would not accept. Start looking now. If you find the perfect pup sooner than your ideal date, don’t hesitate. If you haven’t found one by that date, don’t rush buy, just keep looking…

      Good luck! And remember: never be afraid to get advice from your vet or other trained professionals. Take your time and take research seriously when making your choice. It will determine the success or failure of your relationship with the dog.

    4. It looks like I have a fan! Unfortunately, biology was a long time ago for me, but whether or not my science is right, it is true that you need this type of cleaner to prevent the dog from urinating in the same place. Did I answer ALL of the questions? No. I only answered the ones I felt comfortable with answering. I don’t really believe in spouting nonsense. I’m surprised that I am apparently the troll. Look in the mirror 🙂

  6. Zak would you please do a video on food agression
    I have a 3 month old lab which guards his food and growls when I go near him
    He also growls when I want to get a toy from him
    I don’t want this to grow farther
    Could you please help me out!

    1. I read in a book to take up their food dish and then feed them yourself bit by bit, temporarily. The dog is supposed to get the idea that food comes FROM you, not that you are trying to take it away. Haven’t tried it myself. Good luck.

  7. Nobody seemed to notice Winston is a very beautiful Anatolian Shepherd Dog… Ideal pick for a chewing video as they have the strongest bite of all dog breeds, and they love what they do well! (Livestock guardian breed that prefers to chase the threat away rather than to engage in battle)

  8. My pup has the color coat and ears and mouth like this dog and I imagine my pup growing like him.What kind of breed is that?

  9. Yeah. Training a dog and going through all the repetitions is not only a good exercise for the dog, but also for the human who’s not very patient. LoL!

  10. Lmfao ive lost MANY pairs of flip flops, shoes, belts, etc from my damn dogs in the past BUT i love my fur babies from my past and my present. So many memories😆🤣🤣👌😍😍

LEAVE YOUR COMMENT

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *